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APIASF and CARE Receive $2 Million from National Foundations to Increase Student Success Among Asian American and Pacific Islanders

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NEWS RELEASE

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Tia T. Gordon
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APIASF AND CARE RECEIVE $2 MILLION FROM NATIONAL FOUNDATIONS
TO INCREASE STUDENT SUCCESS AMONG ASIAN AMERICAN AND PACIFIC ISLANDERS
The Kresge Foundation, USA Funds, and the Walmart Foundation Support
the Fastest-Growing Student Population with One of the Largest Investments in History


Washington, D.C., June 20, 2012--The Asian & Pacific Islander American Scholarship Fund (APIASF) and the National Commission on Asian American and Pacific Islander Research in Education (CARE)--the leading AAPI student- and research-focused organizations, respectively--launched today the Partnership for Equity in Education through Research (PEER) project to help realize the full degree-earning potential of the Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) student population.  Considered one of the largest investments in history to increase AAPI student success, the PEER project is a three-year, nearly $2 million effort being supported by The Kresge Foundation, USA Funds, and the Walmart Foundation.


According to the 2010 U.S. Census data, the AAPI population is projected to reach nearly 40 million people by 2050.  AAPI students will also experience a particularly high proportional increase in college enrollment (35 percent) over the next decade.  Unfortunately, the most marginalized and vulnerable AAPI students too often go overlooked and underserved in higher education.  In response, the PEER project will work to achieve the following goals:

  • Support AANAPISIs for Greater Institutional Effectiveness: Asian American and Native American Pacific Islander-Serving Institutions (AANAPISIs) are equipped to help realize the full degree-earning potential of the AAPI student population.  To support AANAPISIs by valuing these institutions' impact on AAPI student success, the PEER project will capture and monitor data to identify promising practices, implement targeted interventions, and mobilize campus leaders. 
  • Share Resources for Widespread AAPI Student Success: America's colleges and universities must prepare adequately for the large and growing 1.3 million AAPI student population, particularly when it comes to addressing these students' unique needs.  To ensure AAPI student success, the PEER project will incentivize AAPI students academically with scholarships and, while in college, provide recipients with academic and social supports to increase their degree attainment.
  • Give More Useful Data about AANAPISIs: Since there is a high level of engagement from policymakers and education leaders to achieve the national college completion goals, they deserve to understand the full degree-earning potential of the AAPI student population.  To demonstrate the relevance of AANAPISIs through useful data, the PEER project will advocate for policies that require all postsecondary institutions to take into account key issues affecting AAPI student access and success in U.S. higher education.
"We're pleased to be spearheading an innovative effort that supports the rapidly growing underserved AAPI student population to complete college," said APIASF President & Executive Director Neil Horikoshi.  "In the coming years, the PEER project can possibly help reshape the entire U.S. higher education system and its barriers to equitably meet the unique needs of these underserved and overlooked students."In addition, the PEER project will also work collaboratively with three of the nation's top AANAPISIs: De Anza College, City College of San Francisco, and South Seattle Community College.  These "pilot" institutions--which have previously demonstrated some of the greatest success when it comes to supporting AAPI students as they pursue their degrees--will serve as key project partners.  Each institution will also receive a small grant for their participation."America's colleges and universities are currently serving 1.3 million AAPI undergraduate students. With the number of AAPI students projected to increase significantly in coming years, we need to investigate and model promising practices and targeted interventions that promote access and success for this population," said CARE Principal Investigator Robert Teranishi.  "Holistic approaches to serve these students' needs are realized at AANAPISIs, which play a vital role in advancing the college completion agenda and the democratic mission of higher education.  Through the PEER project, we would like to achieve the same success beyond our pilot campuses, in other AANAPISIs, and eventually throughout the higher community."

AANAPISIs are minority-serving institutions designated by Congress that have at least a 10 percent enrollment of AAPI students and have a significant number of students who are Pell Grant eligible, among other criteria.  These institutions are enrolling and conferring degrees to a large concentration of the nation's AAPI undergraduate students.  In 2010, the 150 institutions eligible to be AANAPISIs made up only 3.4 percent of the nation's colleges and universities, but enrolled 40.8 percent of all AAPI undergraduates.  AANAPISIs confer undergraduate degrees to a large concentration of AAPI students.  In 2010, the 150 institutions eligible to be AANAPISIs produced 46.6 percent of the associate's degrees and 35.3 percent of the bachelor's degrees awarded to AAPI students nationally.

The PEER project was announced today during the 2012 APIASF third annual higher education summit, with the theme, "Advancing the Democratic Mission of Higher Education: The Relevance of Asian Americans & Pacific Islanders." For more information about the PEER project of the 2012 APIASF higher education summit, visit APIASF's website at www.apiasf.org.  Also, visit CARE's website at www.nyu.edu/projects/care/pp.html.

# # #

About APIASF
Based in Washington, D.C., the Asian & Pacific Islander American Scholarship Fund (APIASF) is the nation's largest non-profit organization devoted to providing college scholarships for Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders (AAPI). APIASF works to create opportunities for students to access, complete, and succeed after post-secondary education; thereby developing future leaders who will excel in their career, serve as role models in their communities, and will ultimately contribute to a vibrant America. Since 2003, APIASF has distributed more than $60 million in scholarships to deserving AAPI students. APIASF manages two scholarship programs: APIASF's general scholarship and the Gates Millennium Scholars/Asian Pacific Islander Americans funded by a grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. The 2012 APIASF higher education summit is made possible through the generous support of our presenting sponsors: The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, The Kresge Foundation, Southwest Airlines, USA Funds, Walmart, and Wells Fargo.

About CARE
The National Commission on Asian American and Pacific Islander Research in Education (CARE), consisting of a national commission, research advisory group, and research team at New York University, aims to engage realistic and actionable discussions about the mobility and educational opportunities for Asian American and Pacific Islanders (AAPIs) and how distinctions of race, ethnicity, language, and other factors play out in the day-to-day operations of America's education system. Our goal is to provide much needed and timely research on key issues and trends related to access and participation of Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders in higher education.

   

APIASF Hosts its Third Annual Higher Education Summit

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Last Updated on Monday, 02 July 2012 16:18


Press Release from Asian & Pacific Islander American Scholarship Fund (APIASF)

June 20, 2012

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The Nation's Largest Gathering to Focus on Increasing Asian American and Pacific Islander College Completion and Student Success

Washington, D.C., June 20, 2012ÔÇöA diverse cross-sector of stakeholders ranging from college presidents, education leaders, and students to policymakers, federal government officials, and corporate executives from across the nation are attending the Asian & Pacific Islander American Scholarship Fund's (APIASF) third annual higher education summit to help increase college completion and student success among Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) students. With the theme "Advancing the Democratic Mission of Higher Education: The Relevance of Asian Americans & Pacific Islanders," the one-day event kicks off today at the Ronald Reagan Building and International Trade Center in Washington, D.C.

The event aims to raise awareness about the unique needs of the AAPI student population and shed light on their experiences in the U.S. higher education landscape. The summit offers panel presentations and a town hall meeting focusing on research and assessment, policy and advocacy, and student outcomes. In addition, the event welcomes for the first time nearly all Asian American and Native American Pacific Islander-Serving Institutions (AANAPISI) college presidents who will discuss the impact of their institutions and other minority-serving institutions on advancing the national college completion goals.

"Our higher education summit is being held to help identify policies and practices concerning not only the success of the AAPI student population, but to support postsecondary education equity and inclusion to increase the success of all students," said APIASF President & Executive Director Neil Horikoshi. "As the United States strives to become globally competitive in the 21st century, additional investments in higher education policies must be made immediately to help address the complex set of social realities faced by students in the underrepresented and underserved AAPI communityÔÇöone of the fastest-growing minority populations in the United States."

Earlier in the day, APIASF, along with its research partner, the National Commission on Asian American and Pacific Islander Research in Education, launched the Partnership for Equity in Education through Research (PEER) project to help realize the full degree-earning potential of the AAPI student population. Considered one of the largest investments in history to increase AAPI student success, the PEER project is a three-year, nearly $2 million effort being supported by The Kresge Foundation, USA Funds, and the Walmart Foundation.

Additionally, in attendance will be several notable leaders who acknowledge the event's valuable contributions to the ongoing conversations about diversity in higher education. One important guest includes Clarence A. Johnson, principal director and director for civilian equal employment opportunity, Office of the Deputy Under Secretary of Defense (Equal Opportunity) at the Pentagon, who said, "The U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) is proud to work closely with APIASF as they help to educate the next generation of leaders. We are committed to furthering diversity in DoD by offering challenging and fulfilling career opportunities to men and women of all backgrounds; as the Department is better served when it reflects the nation it serves."

Finally, APIASF will be hosting a special evening reception to recognize Congressman Mike Honda for his long-standing career in education and his commitment to education equity. In honoring Congressman Honda's efforts to advancing educational opportunities for AAPI students, the reception will provide a networking opportunity for attendees.

For more information about the 2012 APIASF higher education summit, visit APIASF's website at www.apiasf.org. Also, follow APIASF on Facebook (www.facebook.com/apiasf) and Twitter (www.twitter.com/apiasf) to receive live event updates.

About APIASF
Based in Washington, D.C., the Asian & Pacific Islander American Scholarship Fund (APIASF) is the nation's largest non-profit organization devoted to providing college scholarships for Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders (AAPI). APIASF works to create opportunities for students to access, complete, and succeed after post-secondary education; thereby developing future leaders who will excel in their career, serve as role models in their communities, and will ultimately contribute to a vibrant America. Since 2003, APIASF has distributed more than $60 million in scholarships to deserving AAPI students. APIASF manages two scholarship programs: APIASF's general scholarship and the Gates Millennium Scholars/Asian Pacific Islander Americans funded by a grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. The 2012 APIASF higher education summit is made possible through the generous support of our presenting sponsors: The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, The Kresge Foundation, Southwest Airlines, USA Funds, Walmart, and Wells Fargo.

   

May is Asian/Pacific American Heritage Month

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Last Updated on Tuesday, 01 May 2012 17:37


Happy Asian/Pacific American Heritage Month!

Is your campus having Asian American and Pacific Islander programming this May?


Hyphen Magazine has teamed up with the White House Initiative on Asian Americans and Pacific Islander to create some great images and articles about the Asian Pacific Islander American community. You can check out their work here.

Also, the United States Census Bureau has sent out data about the API community. You can view it below:

CB12-FF.09

March 21, 2012

Asian/Pacific American Heritage Month:
May 2012

In 1978, a joint congressional resolution established Asian/Pacific American Heritage Week. The first 10 days of May were chosen to coincide with two important milestones in Asian/Pacific American history: the arrival in the United States of the first Japanese immigrants (May 7, 1843) and contributions of Chinese workers to the building of the transcontinental railroad, completed May 10, 1869. In 1992, Congress expanded the observance to a monthlong celebration. Per a 1997 Office of Management and Budget directive, the Asian or Pacific Islander racial category was separated into two categories: one being Asian and the other Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander. Thus, this Facts for Features contains a section for each.

Asians

17.3 million
The estimated number of U.S. residents of Asian descent, according to the 2010 Census. This group comprised 5.6 percent of the total population. This count includes those who said they were both Asian alone (14.7 million) and Asian in combination with one or more additional races (2.6 million).
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 Census Brief - Overview of Race and Hispanic Origin <www.census.gov/prod/cen2010/briefs/c2010br-02.pdf>

5.6 million
The Asian alone or in combination population in California; the state had the largest Asian population in the 2010 Census, followed by New York (1.6 million). Hawaii had the highest proportion of Asians (57 percent).

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 Census Redistricting Data (Public Law 94-171) Summary File, Custom Table 3, <http://2010.census.gov/news/press-kits/redistricting.html>

46%
Percentage growth of the Asian alone or in combination population between the 2000 and 2010 censuses, which was more than any other major race group.
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 Census Redistricting Data (Public Law 94-171) Summary File, Custom Table 3, <http://2010.census.gov/news/releases/operations/cb11-cn123.html>

3.8 million

Number of Asians of Chinese, except Taiwanese, descent in the U.S. in 2010. Chinese-Americans were the largest Asian group, followed by Filipinos (3.4 million), Asian Indians

(3.2 million), Vietnamese (1.7 million), Koreans (1.7 million) and Japanese (1.3 million). These estimates represent the number of people who reported a specific Asian group alone, and people who reported that Asian group in combination with one or more other Asian groups or races.
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 Census, Table QT-P8, <http://factfinder2.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/DEC/10_SF1/QTP8>

Income, Poverty and Health Insurance

$67,022

Median household income for single-race Asians in 2010.
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 American Community Survey, Table B19013D, <http://factfinder2.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/ACS/10_1YR/B19013D>

Median household income differed greatly by Asian group. For Asian Indians, for example, the median income in 2010 was $90,711; for Bangladeshi, it was $48,471. (These figures represent the single-race population.)
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 American Community Survey, Table S0201, <http://factfinder2.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/ACS/10_1YR/S0201//popgroup~013> and <http://factfinder2.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/ACS/10_1YR/S0201//popgroup~014>

12%

The poverty rate for single-race Asians in 2010, not statistically different from the 2009 poverty rate. Between 2009 and 2010, the poverty rate increased for non-Hispanic whites, for blacks and for Hispanics.
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Income, Poverty, and Health Insurance Coverage in the United States: 2010, <http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/poverty/data/incpovhlth/2010/highlights.html>

18%

Percentage of single-race Asians without health insurance coverage in 2010, up from

16.5 percent in 2009.
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Income, Poverty, and Health Insurance Coverage in the United States: 2010,

<http://www.census.gov/newsroom/releases/archives/income_wealth/cb11-157.html>

Education

50%

The percentage of single-race Asians 25 and older who had a bachelor's degree or higher level of education. This compared with 28 percent for all Americans 25 and older.

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 American Community Survey, Tables B15002D and S1501, <http://factfinder2.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/ACS/10_1YR/B15002D> and

<http://factfinder2.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/ACS/10_1YR/S1501>

85%

The percentage of single-race Asians 25 and older who had at least a high school diploma. This is not statistically different from the percentage for the total population or the percentage of Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander alone, 86 and 87 percent respectively.

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 American Community Survey, Tables B15002D, S1501 and B15002E, <http://factfinder2.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/ACS/10_1YR/B15002D>,

<http://factfinder2.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/ACS/10_1YR/S1501> and

<http://factfinder2.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/ACS/10_1YR/B15002E>

20%

The percentage of single-race Asians 25 and older who had a graduate (e.g., master's or doctorate) or professional degree. This compared with 10 percent for all Americans 25 and older.
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 American Community Survey, Tables B15002D and S1501, <http://factfinder2.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/ACS/10_1YR/B15002D> and

<http://factfinder2.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/ACS/10_1YR/S1501>

Voting

589,000

How many more single-race Asians voted in the 2008 presidential election than in the 2004 election. All in all, 48 percent of Asians turned out to vote in 2008 ÔÇö up 4 percentage points from 2004. A total of 3.4 million Asians voted.
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Voting and Registration in the Election of November 2008, <http://www.census.gov/newsroom/releases/archives/voting/cb09-110.html>

Businesses

Source for the statements referenced in this section, unless otherwise indicated: U.S. Census Bureau, 2007 Survey of Business Owners via American FactFinder,

<http://factfinder2.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/SBO/2007/00CSA01/0100000US/naics~00>

1.5 million
Number of businesses owned by Asian-Americans in 2007, an increase of 40.4 percent from 2002.

$506 billion

Total receipts of businesses owned by Asian-Americans, up 54.9 percent from 2002.

45%
Percentage of Asian-owned businesses that operated in repair and maintenance; personal and laundry services; professional, scientific and technical services; and retail trade.


47%
Percentage of businesses in Hawaii owned by people of Asian descent. It was 14.9 percent in California and 10.1 percent in New York.


508,969
California had the most Asian-owned firms at 508,969 (32.8 percent of all such firms), followed by New York with 196,825 (12.7 percent) and Texas with 114,297 (7.4 percent).

Languages

2.8 million

The number of people 5 and older who spoke Chinese at home in 2010. After Spanish, Chinese was the most widely spoken non-English language in the country. Tagalog, Vietnamese and Korean were each spoken at home by more than 1 million people.
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 American Community Survey, Table B16001,

<http://factfinder2.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/ACS/10_1YR/B16001>

Serving Our Nation

265,200

The number of single-race Asian military veterans. About one in three veterans was 65 years and older.
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 American Community Survey, Table B21001D,

<http://factfinder2.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/ACS/10_1YR/B21001D>

Jobs

48%

The proportion of civilian employed single-race Asians 16 and older who worked in management, business, science and arts occupations, such as financial managers, engineers, teachers and registered nurses. Additionally, 17 percent worked in service occupations,

22 percent in sales and office occupations and 10 percent in production, transportation and material moving occupations.
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 American Community Survey, Table B24010D,

<http://factfinder2.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/ACS/10_1YR/B24010D>

Internet Use

80%

Percentage of Asians living in a household with Internet use ÔÇö the highest rate among race and ethnic groups.
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Reported Internet Usage for Households, by selected Householder Characteristics; Current Population Survey: 2009

<http://www.census.gov/population/www/socdemo/computer/2009.html>

Age Distribution

35.4

Median age of the single-race Asian population in 2010. The corresponding figure was

37.2 years for the population as a whole.
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 Census Summary File 1, Tables P13 and P13D,

<http://factfinder2.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/DEC/10_SF1/P13> and

<http://factfinder2.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/DEC/10_SF1/P13D>

22%

Percent of the single-race Asian population that was under age 18 in 2010 while

9.4 percent was 65 or older.

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 Census Summary File 1, Table P12D,

<http://factfinder2.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/DEC/10_SF1/P12D>

Native Hawaiians and Other Pacific Islanders

1.2 million
The number of U.S. residents who said they were Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander, either alone or in combination with one or more additional races, according to the 2010 Census. This group comprised 0.4 percent of the total population. More than half of all people who identified as Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander reported multiple races (56 percent).

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 Census Brief - Overview of Race and Hispanic Origin, <www.census.gov/prod/cen2010/briefs/c2010br-02.pdf>


Hawaii had the largest population of Native Hawaiians and Other Pacific Islanders among the alone or in combination population with 356,000, followed by California (286,000). Hawaii had the largest proportion of Native Hawaiians and Other Pacific Islanders (26 percent).

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 Census Redistricting Data (Public Law 94-171) Summary File, Custom Table 3, <http://2010.census.gov/news/press-kits/redistricting.html>


40%

Percentage growth of the Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander alone or in combination population between the 2000 and 2010 censuses.
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 Census Redistricting Data (Public Law 94-171) Summary File, Custom Table 3, <http://2010.census.gov/news/releases/operations/cb11-cn123.html>

Income, Poverty and Health Insurance

$52,776

The median income of households headed by single-race Native Hawaiians and Other Pacific Islanders.
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 American Community Survey, Table B19013E,

<http://factfinder2.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/ACS/10_1YR/B19013E>

18.8%

The poverty rate for those who classified themselves as single-race Native Hawaiian and

Other Pacific Islander.
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 American Community Survey, Table S1701,

<http://factfinder2.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/ACS/10_1YR/S1701>

17%

The percentage without health insurance for single-race Native Hawaiians and Other

Pacific Islanders.
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 American Community Survey, Table S2701,

<http://factfinder2.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/ACS/10_1YR/S2701>

Education

15%

The percentage of single-race Native Hawaiians and Other Pacific Islanders 25 and older who had a bachelor's degree or higher. This compared with 28 percent for the total population.
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 American Community Survey, Tables B15002E and S1501,

<http://factfinder2.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/ACS/10_1YR/B15002E> and

<http://factfinder2.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/ACS/10_1YR/S1501>

87%

The percentage of single-race Native Hawaiians and Other Pacific Islanders 25 and older who had at least a high school diploma. This is not statistically different from either the percentage for the total population, 86 percent, or the percentage of Asian alone, 85 percent.
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 American Community Survey, B15002E, S1501, and B15002D, <http://factfinder2.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/ACS/10_1YR/B15002E>,

<http://factfinder2.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/ACS/10_1YR/S1501> and

<http://factfinder2.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/ACS/10_1YR/B15002D>

4%

The percentage of single-race Native Hawaiians and Other Pacific Islanders 25 and older who had obtained a graduate or professional degree. This compared with 10 percent for the total population this age.
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 American Community Survey, Table B15002E and S1501 <http://factfinder2.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/ACS/10_1YR/B15002E> and

<http://factfinder2.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/ACS/10_1YR/S1501>

Businesses

Source for the statements referenced in this section, unless otherwise indicated:
U.S. Census Bureau, 2007 Survey of Business Owners via American FactFinder
<http://factfinder2.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/SBO/2007/00CSA01/0100000US/naics~00>

37,687
The number of Native Hawaiian- and Other Pacific Islander-owned businesses in 2007, up

30.2 percent from 2002.

$6.3 billion

Total receipts of these businesses, up 47.7 percent from 2002.

45%

The percent of all Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander-owned business revenue that construction and retail trade accounted for.

9%
The percent of businesses in Hawaii owned by Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islanders, highest among all states.

Serving Our Nation

27,800

The number of single-race Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander military veterans. About one in five veterans was 65 years and older.
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 American Community Survey, B21001E,

<http://factfinder2.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/ACS/10_1YR/B21001E>

Jobs

26%

The proportion of civilian employed single-race Native Hawaiians and Other Pacific Islanders

16 and older who worked in management, business, science and arts occupations, such as financial managers, engineers, teachers and registered nurses (not statistically different from service and sales occupations). Additionally, 24 percent worked in service occupations, while 27 percent worked in sales and office occupations and 14 percent in production, transportation and material moving occupations.
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 American Community Survey, Table B24010E,

<http://factfinder2.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/ACS/10_1YR/B24010E>

Age Distribution

28.9

The median age of the single-race Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander population in 2010. The median age was 37.2 for the population as a whole.
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 Census Summary File 1, Tables P13 and P13E, <http://factfinder2.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/DEC/10_SF1/P13> and <http://factfinder2.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/DEC/10_SF1/P13E>

29%

Percentage of the single-race Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander population that was under age 18 in 2010 while 5.8 percent was 65 or older.

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 Census Summary File 1, Table P12E,

<http://factfinder2.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/DEC/10_SF1/P12E>

Following is a list of observances typically covered by the Census Bureau's Facts for Features series:

Black History Month (February)                                                   Labor Day

Super Bowl                                Grandparents Day

Valentine's Day (Feb. 14)                            Hispanic Heritage Month (Sept. 15-Oct. 15)

Women's History Month (March)                        Unmarried and Single Americans Week

Irish-American Heritage Month (March)/                       Halloween (Oct. 31)

St. Patrick's Day (March 17)                            American Indian/Alaska Native Heritage Month

Asian/Pacific American Heritage Month (May)                          (November)

Older Americans Month (May)                                Veterans Day (Nov. 11)                           

Cinco de Mayo (May 5)                                                            Thanksgiving Day

Mother's Day                                                      The Holiday Season (December)                    

Hurricane Season Begins (June 1)                            

Father's Day                               

The Fourth of July (July 4)

Anniversary of Americans with Disabilities Act (July 26)

Back to School (August)

Editor's note: The preceding data were collected from a variety of sources and may be subject to sampling variability and other sources of error. Facts for Features are customarily released about two months before an observance in order to accommodate magazine production timelines. Questions or comments should be directedto the Census Bureau's Public Information Office: telephone: 301-763-3030; fax: 301-763-3762; or e-mail: < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >.


US Census Bureau

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Updates from the White House Iniative on Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders

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Posted by Chris Lu, Co-Chair for the White House Initiative on Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders, as well as Assistant to the President and Cabinet Secretary

Earlier this week, in his annual State of the Union Address, President Obama laid out his Blueprint for an America Built to Last.  This includes our Administration's unwavering commitment to preserving the American dream for all, including the nearly 17 million Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders (AAPIs) across our nation.  Below, read more about how the Initiative will help carry the President's message to AAPIs across the country.  Also, learn about our upcoming Weekly Web Chat Series and other exciting federal work.

In his State of the Union Address, the President laid out a blueprint for an economy that's built to last - an economy built on American manufacturing, American energy, skills for American workers, and a renewal of American values. The President believes this is a make or break moment for the middle class and those trying to reach it.  What's at stake is the very survival of the basic American promise that if you work hard, you can do well enough to raise a family, own a home, and put enough away for retirement.

The defining issue of our time is how to keep that promise alive.  No challenge is more urgent; no debate is more important.  We can either settle for a country where a shrinking number of people do really well, while more Americans barely get by.  Or we can build a nation where everyone gets a fair shot, everyone does their fair share, and everyone plays by the same rules.  At stake right now are not Democratic or Republican values, but American values - and for the sake of our future, we have to reclaim them.

On Thursday, I took part in White House Office Hours via Twitter on the State of the Union's priorities and how they affect the AAPI community.  To read more about our discussion, click HERE.

Over the next few weeks, the White House Initiative on AAPIs will have many opportunities for you to take an active role in the work of our government.  Here's what's coming up:

  • January 27, 2012: Columbus, OH, WHIAAPI roundtable with the Ohio Asian American Advisory Commission and other community leaders
  • January 28, 2012: Columbia, MD, WHIAAPI Advisor Tuyet Duong to keynote a conference of Mid-Atlantic Union of Vietnamese Student Associations
  • February 1, 2012: Conference call with AAPI community on the State of the Union Address, centering on initiatives to alleviate student debt, featuring Zakiya Smith, Domestic Policy Council, and Chris Lu, Co-chair of the White House Initiative on AAPIs
  • February 6, 2012: Washington, DC, AAPI business leaders briefing and State of the Union conversation
  • February 15-16: Fayetteville, AR, WHIAAPI education event at the University of Arkansas; engagement with Hmong American farmers and Marshallese communities
  • February 16, 2012: Memphis, TN, WHIAAPI roundtable forum with community leaders
  • February 16, 2012: San Francisco, CA, US Citizenship and Immigration Services roundtable and Chinese-language forum
  • February 21, 2012: Jacksonville, FL, WHIAAPI Summit on Entrepreneurship and Small Business Growth
  • February 24-26, 2012: Durham, NC,  Eddie Lee, White House Office of Public Engagement to keynote the East Coast Asian American Student Union Conference

To learn more about these events, please email This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

Weekly Web Chat Series with the White House Initiative

In the spirit of  the President's commitment to engaging the American public, the WHIAAPI will host a web chat with the community every Wednesday from 3-4pm EST.  This is your opportunity to interact with officials from across the Administration, ask questions, and share your concerns and ideas on how our government can effectively work with you.  In addition, you will receive firsthand knowledge on how to better access federal programs and services.

To kick off the series, please join a conference call/webchat on Obama Administration Efforts to Alleviate Student Debt on Wednesday, February 1, 2012, at 3 PM EST. As the first in a series of financial literacy conference calls and webchats, hear from officials from the White House, Department of Education, and the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau to learn about federal income-based repayment programs, college cost comparisons, federal student financial aid, and other federal programs.

WHAT:           Conference call on Obama Administration initiatives to alleviate student debt

WHO: Chris Lu, Co-chair of the White House Initiative on AAPIs

Zakiya Smith, White House Domestic Policy Council

Phil Martin, Department of Education

Rohit Chopra, Consumer Financial Protection Bureau

WHEN:           Wednesday, February 1, 2012 at 3PM EST

HOW:             Email This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it with "RSVP for 2/1 Call" in the heading by Jan. 31 at 12PM EST.

This call is hosted in partnership with the White House Initiatives on Historically Black Colleges and Universities, Educational Excellence for Hispanics, and Tribal Colleges and Universities.

Information on how to join each week's web chat will be provided in the Initiative's Weekly Highlights.  To join our distribution list and receive the Weekly Highlights, please email This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

page or tweet us at @WhiteHouseAAPI with topic suggestions or issues you would like to discuss!

Federal Agency Announcements

  • On January 20, the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) announced a final rule which ensures that women with health insurance coverage will have access to the full range of preventive services without any co-pays and/or deductibles. To learn more about this rule, click HERE.
  • The Department of Education is now accepting applications for the Teaching Ambassador Fellowships program.  The fellowships allow educators to work at the Department of Education on a full- or part-time basis. Applications are due by Feb 27, 2012. For more information, click HERE.
  • On January 31, at 2:30PM EST, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) will hold a Webinar on their proposed amendments to the National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants from the Pulp and Paper Industry. To register for the Webinar, click HERE.
  • On February 9, nominations are due for the Census Bureau's Census Scientific Advisory Committee. For more information on the committee and the nomination process, visit the Federal Register Notice HERE.
  • The Department of Homeland Security is now accepting applications for the Career Development Grant (CDG). Applications are due by March 22, 2012. To learn more about this grant and to apply, click HERE.
  • The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) released an Information Bulletin that provides information for State Medicaid Agencies and other interested parties regarding the prohibition on "balance-billing" Qualified Medicare Beneficiaries (QMB) for Medicare cost-sharing, including deductible, coinsurance, and copayments.

Federal Agency Openings

  • The Environmental Protection Agency posted two Senior Executive Service vacancies in Region 8, which serves the Mountain West states.  To apply for the Assistant Regional Administrator for the Office of Ecosystem Protection and Remediation position, click HERE.  To apply for the Assistant Regional Administrator for the Office of Partnerships and Regulatory Assistance position, click HERE.
You can follow Chris Lu on Twitter @ChrisLu44.
   

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